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Learning Centre

Welcome to the CIVITAS Learning Centre

This website contains a large library of e-learning resources about all aspects of sustainable mobility. Below you can filter this collection of past eCourses, recorded webinars, presentations held at webinars, training material, etc. By selecting multiple criteria you will narrow down the search results. If you leave a filter empty, it is the same as if you selected all options in a given field.

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1 - 15 out of 20 results.

eCourse

Nov 2019
Free
en.

Sustainable Urban Mobility Indicators

The Sustainable Urban Mobility Indicators (SUMI) project invites you to save the date for the launch of its online indicator training course!

The course is aimed at representatives of urban areas that want to measure and track the performance of sustainable mobility and mobility professionals that would like to better understand the collection of urban mobility data.

Course tutors will provide expert insight to familiarise participants with the SUMI indicator set and to offer guidance in the process of applying the indicators with real-world examples.

During the course, mobility experts will be on hand to answer any questions participants may have about the indicators. Participants will also be able to access online course materials and an online forum at any point after the course finishes.

The course is structured along four main themes:

  • Introduction and Current Mobility Situation
  • Public Transport System
  • Transport Externalities
  • Integration and Next Steps

The course will conclude with a live webinar highlighting the performance of a custom-made benchmarking tool that will compare the performance of the cities who participated in the initial testing and revision of the SUMI indicator set.

The eCourse will be launched on 18 November and will be active until 13 December.

Participants can access the course on the Rupprecht Consult eLearning Platform.

Contacts

SUMI Project

Webinar

Jul 2019
Free
en.

CIVITAS webinars

In this webinar, the key components of the CIVITAS evaluation process are discussed. Dirk Engels, Transport and Mobility Leuven, presents the key elements of this innovative approach.

This centres on conducting both process and impact evaluations. By doing so, it is possible to understand the barriers to and drivers of a measure's implementation, as well as the effect that it has.

Through its six impact categories, the CIVITAS approach tells the full story of mobility measures, one that extends beyond pure facts and figures.

Contacts

Transport Mobility Leuven

Webinar

Apr 2019
Free
en.

CIVITAS SUNRISE Webinars

Zaragoza Logistics Center (ZLC), project partners of CIVITAS SUNRISE, organised a webinar on how to adapt Sustainable Urban Mobility Plans (SUMPs) to the neighbourhood level.

The points addressed were:

  • What is a Sustainable Urban Mobility Plan (SUMP)?
  • Benefits
  • Process of a SUMP: from step 1 to 11
  • Good practices examples
  • Q/A round

Key take away: Integrating not only passengers but also freight in the SUMP development decreases noise, emissions and congestion in the neighbourhoods, improves road safety, enhances business economic development, and improves the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of the transportation of goods.

Contacts

CIVITAS SUNRISE

Webinar

Oct 2018
Free
en.

Meeting of the Minds

Parking is a particularly tough issue for cities across the globe. Municipalities, both large and small, face the challenge of balancing the needs of a range of stakeholders - residents, tourists, pedestrians, businesses, schools, and others - who all have different parking demands. The city of Bad Hersfeld, Germany, sought to change how it handles traffic for both residents and visitors, particularly during special events.

A small city of approximately 30,000 just outside of Frankurt, Bad Hersfield is well known for its festivals, particularly the Bad Hersfelder Festspiele. The city's Mayor, Thomas Fehling, implemented a more streamlined approach to parking management with the help of smart parking IoT solutions.

In this webinar, Mayor Fehling will share how the city deployed this new technology, which reduced the amount of time drivers searched for parking, lessened congestion on the roadways, lowered emissions, and increased efficiencies across its open-air parking lots. He will be joined by Thomas Hohenacker, Cleverciti Systems CEO, who will share some of his key insights from his work deploying parking solutions across cities in the Middle East, Europe and the US.Less

Contacts

Meeting of the Minds

eCourse

Jul 2018
Free
en.

CIVITAS SUITS E-Courses

This course on public procurement, innovative financing methods and business models is targeted at decision makers in cities. 

The course aims to elaborate on public procurement practices and identify methods that are used by cities to finance sustainable transport projects. 

The course instructors will also share their experience on innovative business models that enable cities to bring together various stakeholders in implementing sustainable transport. 

This course will be held both as a self-paced version with webinars and online conferences where participants will have an opportunity to directly interact with the instructors.

The course is being offered as part of the CIVITAS SUITS project.

For more information, please contact: Dr. Frederic Rudolph

 

Contacts

CIVITAS SUITS

Webinar

Jun 2018
Free
en.

EIP-SCC Sustainable Urban Mobility Action Cluster Webinar

Are you interested in smart mobility? Would you like to know more about 5 European initiatives that roll out new, smarter and sustainable solutions in European cities?

The EIP-SCC Sustainable Urban Mobility Action Cluster (EIP-SCC SUM AC) is pleased to invite you to a webinar taking place on-line on 20th June 2018, from 13:00 to 14:30 CET.

This webinar will give you the opportunity to hear about the cities and companies that are leading 5 actions as part of the European Innovation Partnership in Smart cities and communities. Their aim is to become the leading platform for understanding city needs, for bringing stakeholders together, building the tools that support an innovation pipeline, and directly supporting individual networks and projects that are en-route to realisation.

The Sustainable Urban Mobility Action Cluster focuses on five Initiatives:

  • Urban Air Mobility (UAM) – lead by Airbus, it aims to  contribute to bringing urban mobility into the third dimension – the airspace (flying vehicles)– by offering a marketplace-driven forum of diverse mobility stakeholders (ground and air) to jointly work towards city-centric demonstration projects at intra-city and inter-city (regional) level;
  • Intelligent Mobility For Energy Transition (IMET) – lead by Nissan, it aims to create a mechanism for the development of sustainable energy models through e-mobility solutions as an innovative product for the development of smart cities;
  • New Mobility Services (NMS) – lead by the Province of Noord-Brabant/ Brabanstad, it aims to build a common ground for New Mobility Services, supporting service replication and cooperation between cities and private sector;
  • E-Vehicles for Smart Cities and Communities (EV4SCC) – lead by Urban Foresight, it is mobilising a Europe-wide dialogue on the potential for electric vehicles to be integrated with smart city initiatives and aims to create the world’s largest marketplace for smart electric mobility solutions;
  • Alternative Fuels Special Vehicles (AFSV) – lead by Aebi-Schmidt, it aims to create a guideline that draws on the very latest and most appropriate technologies to recommend to cities to help steer a clear path in order to achieve the zero emission target in the field of special vehicles.

Participation to the webinar is free. If you wish to participate, please register here.

Contacts

EIP-SCC

Webinar

Jun 2018
Free
en.

CIVITAS SUITS webinars

This first SUITS webinar deals with public procurement, innovative financing and business models for sustainable urban transport and mobility. The recording is now available at the link below. The webinar is also complemented by an e-learning course - find it here - which discusses aspects mentioned in the webinar in more detail.

Contacts

elena@signosis.eu
CIVITAS SUITS

Webinar

May 2018
Free
en.

SUMPs-Up City Webinar Presentations

In the latest webinar from the CIVITAS SUMPs-Up city webinar series, the city of Donostia-San Sebastian in Spain discusses the development and implementation of its Sustainable Urban Mobility Plan (SUMP).

The process of changing the mobility culture in the city started 25 years ago, and has been met with opposition along the way. Through engagement and innovative measures, however, this has been overcome.

Donostia-San Sebastian is one of the SUMPs-Up city partners.

 

Contacts

CIVITAS SUMPs-Up

Webinar

Mar 2018
Free
en.

BRT Planning Webinar

The webinar will describe key insights of Volume 3 (Communications) which presents the necessary steps to building a communications strategy used for engaging the public with BRT projects, educating customers on how to use the system, and marketing the project to a wide array of potential users. This includes a strategic plan, public participation, marketing, and customer service.

Contacts

Institute for Transportation and Development Policy

Webinar

Jan 2018
Free
en.

Webinar

Research conducted over the last few decades in many western countries confirms that there is a mutually reinforcing relationship between transport poverty (i.e. lack of access to both private and public mobility resources) and social exclusion (inability to fully participate in life-enhancing activities).

In these contexts, households that do not own cars are overwhelmingly concentrated in the lowest income quintiles, where approximately only half of households own cars. For low income households with cars, mobility is still reduced -- they make significantly fewer trips and travel much shorter distances than their higher-income, car-owning counterparts.

The experience of reduced mobility often means that low income households are unable to fully participate in key activities, such as employment, education, health care and food shopping. It is perhaps for these reasons that car ownership among low-income households in the UK has increased more rapidly year on year than for other income brackets. Yet this statistical trend tells us very little about the actual motivations behind why people living on or near ‘the breadline’ (i.e. in poverty) are willing to commit so much of their limited financial resources to owning and running a private vehicle. They do so even when they find it difficult to afford other basic necessities, such as food, warmth, shelter and clothing. Much of transportation policy is based on the idea that low-income people do not own cars. Yet a growing body of evidence suggests that this is no longer the case.

What does the experience of low-income car ownership mean for our work in transportation, and what lessons learned from other western countries can help guide our efforts here in Canada? Join transportation expert Karen Lucas as she explores these issues and discusses the ‘auto motives’ of low-income populations, by drawing on case study evidence from different geographical and social contexts over the last 20 yrs.

Webinar Highlights

In this webinar, you will learn:

  • What social exclusion is and how it relates to transportation;
  • The various motivations behind car ownership for low income households and individuals;
  • The opportunities and challenges of car ownership for people of limited financial means; and
  • Further research and policy measures required to help address these issues.

Contacts

The Conference Board of Canada

Webinar

Dec 2017
Free
en.

Invitation: Webinar on Urban cycling – A smart move! How to integrate cycling into sustainable urban transport systems

This webinar will discuss the opportunities and the challenges of urban cycling, such as current approaches on the sustainable implementation of cycling infrastructure and related policy development for urban stakeholders and the future of station based and free-floating bike sharing.

Mr. Daizong Liu, from the World Resources Institute (WRI), will talk about how “Bikes make cities thrive again” and

Mr. Pablo Celis, from the Municipality of Aarhus, Denmark, one of the cycling-friendliest nations in the world, will tell the story of “The rise of a cycling city”.  

Mr. Sebastian Ibold, from GIZ China, will moderate the presentations and discussions.

 

The planned schedule is as follows:

1. Welcome and introduction (10 minutes)

Moderator: Mr. Sebastian Ibold (GIZ China)

2. Input presentation (20 minutes)

"Bikes makes cities thrive again“

Speaker: Mr. Daizong Liu (World Resources Institute WRI) – 20 minutes presentation

3. Input presentation (20 minutes)

"The rise of a cycling city“

Speaker: Mr. Pablo Celis (Municipality of Aarhus) – 20 minutes presentation

4. Interactive discussion with the audience (30 minutes)

 

Target Audience

GIZ Transport & Environment (T&E) Working Group Members and other interested “sustainable transport”, “urban” and “climate“ colleagues from GIZ, as well as collaborators and partners from the development community.

Contacts

Sustainable Urbam Transport Projects
This course was funded by:

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit

eCourse

Oct 2017
Free
en.

Co-Creating Sustainable Cities

Around the world, major challenges of our time such as population growth and climate change are being addressed in cities. Here, citizens play an important role amidst governments, companies, NGOs and researchers in creating social, technological and political innovations for achieving sustainability.

Citizens can be co-creators of sustainable cities when they engage in city politics or in the design of the urban environment and its technologies and infrastructure. In addition, citizens influence and are influenced by the technologies and systems that they use every day. Sustainability is thus a result of the interplay between technology, policy and people’s daily lives. Understanding this interplay is essential for creating sustainable cities. In this MOOC, we zoom in on Amsterdam, Beijing, Ho Chi Minh City, Nairobi, Kampala and Suzhou as living labs for exploring the dynamics of co-creation for sustainable cities worldwide. We will address topics such as participative democracy and legitimacy, ICTs and big data, infrastructure and technology, and SMART technologies in daily life.

This global scope will be used to illustrate why specific forms of co-creation are preferred in specific urban contexts. Moreover, we will investigate and compare these cities on three themes that have a vast effect on city life:

  •  Water and waste
  •  Energy, air, food and mobility
  •  Green spaces and food

This MOOC will teach you about the dynamics of co-creation and the key principles of citizens interacting with service providing companies, technology and infrastructure developers, policy makers and researchers. You will gain an understanding of major types of co-creation and their interdependency with their socio-technical and political contexts. You will become equipped to indicate how you can use co-creation to develop innovative technologies, policy arrangements or social practices for a sustainable city in your own community. You will demonstrate this by developing an action plan, research proposal or project idea.

Basic knowledge of sustainability in urban settings, urban environmental technology and urban management is assumed.

This course forms a part of two educational programme of the Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Metropolitan Solutions (AMS) - AMS Vital and Circular city research themes. It is developed by Wageningen UR and TU Delft, two of the founding universities of AMS Institute, and in cooperation with Tsinghua University.

What you will learn:

  • Different definitions, forms and typical examples of co-creation for developing sustainable urban water, energy and green systems.
  • The potential of co-creation for developing sustainable cities.
  • The interdependency between co-creation and its policy and socio-technical contexts.
  • Comparison of different real-life cases of co-creation.
  • To understand interdependencies between the real-life cases of co-creation and their policy and socio-technical contexts.
  • How to formulate the potential of co-creation in your work or daily life.

Contacts

Wageningen University
This course was funded by:

Wageningen University

Webinar

Jun 2015
Free
en.

SUTP Webinar

Planning and policy decisions in Urban Mobility Plans (UMPs) are optimally based on extensive transport system data, travel demand data as well as travel behaviour. Developed cities and regions are using transport demand models to investigate the impact of particular measures. Those models rely on data input from various sources - i.e. from traffic counts, household surveys and further socio-economic and geo data. Most developing cities lack such comprehensive data to inform mobility planning and policy decisions, but many are catching up. At the same time, classic transport master plans are not flexible enough to react on the dynamic growth of developing cities, as they’re not regularly reviewed and thus, becoming obsolete.

Contacts

transport@giz.de
GIZ Christopher Kost, Jaya Bharathi Bathmaraj

eCourse

Apr 2015
es.

UNITAR webinar series

El crecimiento rápido, no planificado y descoordinado de las ciudades ha puesto seriamente en peligro los sistemas de transporte existentes y ha incrementado significativamente el desafío de crear futuros sistemas de transporte, especialmente en los países en desarrollo. Es en los países en desarrollo, principalmente en las áreas urbanas, donde el mayor crecimiento del parque automotor se ha visto en los últimos años y se espera para los años venideros. Los impactos ambientales y sociales de estas tendencias son significativos ya que están directamente relacionados con la calidad de vida y la productividad urbana. Estos impactos incluyen congestión, consumo energético, contaminación del aire, carencias de seguridad y accidentes de tráfico. Por ende, las cuestiones de transporte urbano son de suma importancia para apoyar las exigencias de movilidad en las ciudades de rápido crecimiento y necesitan nuevas aproximaciones. Sin embargo, el transporte urbano es un asunto más político que técnico. Los aspectos técnicos son relativamente simples. Las decisiones difíciles están relacionadas con la ciudad que queremos y la manera como queremos vivir en ella. “¿Quién se va a beneficiar de los modelos adoptados? ¿Nos atrevemos a crear un modelo diferente al de las denominadas ciudades del mundo avanzado? ¿Nos atrevemos a crear un sistema de transporte que le dé prioridad a los pobres en lugar de a la minoría propietaria de automóvil particular? ¿Estamos tratando de encontrar la forma más eficiente y económica de mover a la población de la ciudad de la manera más limpia y cómoda? ¿O simplemente estamos tratando de minimizar los atascos del tráfico de las clases altas? Estas preguntas son formuladas por Enrique Peñalosa, ex-alcalde de Bogotá (Colombia), quién introdujo una serie de medidas de transporte sostenible en su ciudad. Este curso de Movilidad Urbana Sostenible en Países en Desarrollo está diseñado para proveer respuestas a las preguntas mencionadas así como soluciones y aproximaciones alternativas en planeación de transporte urbano que apunten a un sistema de transporte más sostenible en las ciudades de países en desarrollo.

Contacts

e-dcp@unitar.org
UNITAR

Webinar

Jul 2014
Free
en.

SUTP Webinar

The webinar will deepen the understanding of urban development, of the consequences and implications for urban transport and on how to achieve integrated and more effective sustainable urban mobility planning in developing cities. Good and bad practice examples will be shown, and key concepts for integrating urban planning and urban transport will be outlined.

Contacts

transport@giz.de
GIZ

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