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Cycling provisions

Brighton & Hove

This measure introduced innovative engineering measures along the city’s cycle network to reduce stop-start cycling conditions, improve cycling journey times and reduce cycle conflict with other traffic.

Cyclist in Brighton & Hove
Implementing sustainable mobility

This measure introduced innovative engineering measures along the city’s cycle network to reduce stop-start cycling conditions, improve cycling journey times and reduce cycle conflict with other traffic.

The measure forms 3 elements:

  • A shared surface through a reinvented ‘pocket park’.
  • Innovative ramps that enable people with cycles to navigate physical barriers created by (rail bridge) steps.
  • Road marking to enable cyclists to turn left at an otherwise straight ahead only junction.
How did the measure progress?

Evaluation for this measure has focused predominantly on cycle counts based upon before and after video surveys conducted at the two sites. Members of the general public were also interviewed in Station Street about the impact that the pocket park scheme had had upon their perception of that area.   

The results suggest that the measures in St James’s Street has had a significant impact upon how southbound cycles enter into St James’s Street; with a significant increase in the number of cyclists using the carriageway rather than the footway when entering St James’s Street.

Overall, the installations in Station Street appear to have had a positive impact upon the general public’s perception and use of this area. Previously the area was neglected and lacked a sense of purpose; the new arrangement has significantly improved the general perception of the area and allowed people to spend time there. The measure has also been successful in increasing cyclist numbers through the study area by 17% since its installation.

 

What were the outcomes of the measure?
  • The design of the pocket park has successfully created an environment which balances the needs of cycles travelling through the park, and people wanting to spend time in the area.  The successful design has demonstrated that different competing demands can be accommodated in compact spaces; the design has increased the number of cycles which use the cycle track rather than the footways, and the new seating and art installations have improved the general public’s perception of the area too.
  • The new road markings and street signage have encouraged more cycles to take a left turn at the St James St junction; the results highlight the importance of providing simple cycle infrastructure can have a significant effect upon cyclists’ behaviour.
  • Working in partnership with university students on the cycle ramp project was positive as it enabled new ideas to be generated.   However ultimately this element was not successfully developed to implementation stage due to the inexperience of the students. The risks of working with students on innovative projects are high and may not have been justifiable in this instance.

 

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